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Sunday, 23 April 2017

Yearbook 2007

PFI Yearbook 2007

PFI Yearbook 2007

2007 will be some year if it keeps pace with 2006. Progress, and budgets, were made on all fronts in 2006. There were some reverses in the year but, by and large, all the challenges were met and overcome. The market is currently in a 'hot' state. One, older, infrastructure banker said he had waited a career for his sector to be in favour. Indeed Mr Burnham.

The new infraco market

PFI Yearbook 2007

The past 12 months have been an action packed year in the acquisition world, with a raft of purchases being made across the Infrastructure sector. By Rene Kassis, Iain Wales, Lionel Epely and Sarah Heavey, Dexia.

Penn and NJ lead the way

PFI Yearbook 2007

The trend towards very large financings to back road sell-offs should continue in 2007 in the US, with Pennsylvania and New Jersey generating the most interest. In Canada, regional governments are now legally required to consider PPPs for many projects, based on the success of recent deals. By Alison Healey.

The Pacific link – PPP and P3

PFI Yearbook 2007

As a relatively new but growing company, we have become used to people being initially curious as to why Plenary Group chose to establish itself jointly in the Australian and Canadian markets. By Paul Oppenheim and Paul Dunstan, managing directors, Plenary Group.

BC PPP - A growing market

PFI Yearbook 2007

Michael Marasco is vice-president, partnerships development and delivery with Partnerships British Columbia. He discusses the best practices developed to date and looks ahead at the growing PPP market in British Columbia and Canada.

Boom needs infra back-up

PFI Yearbook 2007

The commodities boom will continue in 2007 and this will be coupled by the imperative on a state level that infrastructure renewal is needed in support. By John Arbouw.

Benelux PPPs roll out

PFI Yearbook 2007

The Benelux region has seen an array of interesting and innovate PPPs tendered during 2006, as both Belgium and the Netherlands have attempted to make premium progress in key infrastructure projects on the back of a year of promise. By Antony Collins.

Capitalising on carbon

PFI Yearbook 2007

Open the Financial Times from any day in the last month and the chances are you'll see an article about climate change and the impact on business. Ian Milborrow, assistant director in PricewaterhouseCoopers' Carbon Market Services, looks at the implications of climate change for investment planning and financing.

Fuel for the bio future

PFI Yearbook 2007

Road transport fuel is the most identifiable culprit of climate change for the majority of consumers, and is the largest, and fastest growing, demand segment for fossil fuels. By Ben Warren, renewable energy, waste and clean energy group, Ernst & Young.

Brazil leads the bio-way

PFI Yearbook 2007

As interest in Brazilian ethanol remains strong and sponsors flock to investors' doorsteps seeking financing, it is worth taking a look at some of the risks faced. By Guilherme Ferreira, associate at Sidley Austin LLP, New York and Marcello Lobo, associate at Pinheiro Neto Advogados, Rio de Janeiro.

A barrier to greenfield

PFI Yearbook 2007

There remains a great deal of demand for new power generating capacity in Asia but developments of new greenfield projects were few this year, particularly compared with the Middle East. Minerva Lau writes.

Mining scaling the highs

PFI Yearbook 2007

This year has been one of the best in recent history for mining, especially in emerging market countries. Barry Marshall investigates.

Managing LNG shipping risk

PFI Yearbook 2007

The new generation of large LNG ships for the Qatargas LNG project has provided the industry with a new set of technical challenges. By Thanos Koliopulos and Derek Liddle, Lloyd’s Register.

The Scarlet Pimperel

PFI Yearbook 2007

A stellar year for project finance in 2006 but it has not all been plain sailing – especially at the annual British Wind Energy Association sailing day on the Solent in September attended by 500 people . . . er, no wind.